Pertuzumab gets FDA priority review

February 10, 2012 12:54 PM

FDA grants Roche’s pertuzumab Priority Review for previously untreated HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer.

Roche announced on Wednesday that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has accepted the company’s Biologics License Application for pertuzumab and granted Priority Review. The proposed indication is pertuzumab in combination with Herceptin (trastuzumab) and docetaxel chemotherapy for people with HER2-positive metastatic or locally recurrent, unresectable breast cancer, who have not received previous treatment or whose disease has relapsed after adjuvant therapy. The FDA confirmed the action date is June 8, 2012.

“We are pleased that the FDA has granted pertuzumab a Priority Review because new medicines are needed for HER2-positive breast cancer,” said Hal Barron, M.D., Chief Medical Officer and Head, Global Product Development. “We have been researching HER2-positive breast cancer for more than 30 years, and we hope an expedited review will help us quickly bring another personalized medicine to people battling this aggressive disease.”

The pertuzumab application is based on results from the pivotal Phase III CLEOPATRA study. The study demonstrated a 6.1 month improvement in median progression-free survival (PFS) for people who received a pertuzumab-based regimen (pertuzumab combined with Herceptin and docetaxel chemotherapy) compared to those who received Herceptin and chemotherapy alone (median PFS 18.5 vs. 12.4 months). People who received the combination also experienced a 38 percent reduction in the risk of their disease worsening or death (HR=0.62, p=<0.0001, according to independent review).

Adverse events (AEs) were consistent with those seen in previous studies of pertuzumab and Herceptin, either in combination or alone.

About Pertuzumab
Pertuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody being studied in early and advanced stages of HER2-positive breast cancer and advanced HER2-positive gastric cancer. Pertuzumab, a HER2 Dimerisation Inhibitor, is unique in that it is designed specifically to prevent the HER2 receptor from pairing (dimerising) with other HER receptors (EGFR/HER1, HER3 and HER4), a process that is believed to play a critical role in the growth and formation of several different cancer types. By preventing receptor pairing, pertuzumab is thought to block cell signalling, which may inhibit cancer cell growth or lead to the death of the cancer cell. Binding of pertuzumab to HER2 may also signal the body’s immune system to destroy the cancer cells.

The mechanisms of action of pertuzumab and Herceptin are believed to complement each other, as both bind to the HER2 receptor but on different regions. The goal of combining pertuzumab with Herceptin and chemotherapy is to determine if the combination may provide a more comprehensive blockade of HER signalling pathways.

About Herceptin
Herceptin (trastuzumab) is a humanised monoclonal antibody, designed to target and block the function of HER2, a protein produced by a specific gene with cancer-causing potential when it is overexpressed. The mode of action of Herceptin is unique in that it activates the body’s immune system and suppresses HER2 signalling to target and destroy the tumour. Herceptin has demonstrated unprecedented efficacy in treating both early and advanced (metastatic) HER2-positive breast cancer. Given on its own as monotherapy as well as in combination with or following standard chemotherapy, Herceptin has been shown to improve overall survival, response rates and disease-free survival while maintaining quality of life in women with HER2-positive breast cancer. Herceptin is marketed in the United States by Genentech, in Japan by Chugai and internationally by Roche. Since 1998, Herceptin has been used to treat almost 1 million patients with HER2-positive breast cancer worldwide.

 

Editor’s comment: Pertuzumab is one of the “defence projects” of Roche against Herceptin biosimilars. To get the priority review seems to be a big step to get the licence in the US and it seems Roche will strenghthen their hand before any biosimilars enter the market.

Source: Roche press release

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