FDA approves Roche’s Kadcyla for HER2-positive breast cancer

February 25, 2013 8:31 AM

Roche last week announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Kadcyla (trastuzumab emtansine or T-DM1) for the treatment of people with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer (mBC) who have received prior treatment with Herceptin (trastuzumab) and a taxane chemotherapy.

Kadcyla is the fourth medicine from Roche to receive FDA approval for people with advanced cancers within the past two years.

An antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) is a new kind of targeted cancer medicine that can attach to certain types of cancer cells and deliver chemotherapy directly to them. Kadcyla is the first FDA-approved ADC for treating HER2-positive mBC, an aggressive form of the disease.

“Kadcyla is an antibody-drug conjugate representing a completely new way to treat HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer, and it helped people in the EMILIA study live nearly six months longer,” said Hal Barron, M.D., Roche’s Chief Medical Officer and Head, Global Product Development. “We currently have more than 25 antibody-drug conjugates in our pipeline and hope this promising approach will help us deliver more medicines to fight other cancers in the future.”

Kadcyla is made up of the antibody, trastuzumab, and the chemotherapy, DM1, joined together using a stable linker. Kadcyla combines the mechanisms of action of both trastuzumab and DM1, and it is the first Roche ADC approved by the FDA. Roche has studied ADC science for more than a decade and has eight ADCs in Phase I or Phase II studies for different types of cancer.

Roche has also submitted a Marketing Authorisation Application to other Regulatory Authorities around the world, including the European Medicines Agency (EMA), for Kadcyla for the treatment of people with HER2-positive mBC. This application is currently under review by the EMA.

The drug, which was known as T-DM1, is an important step from Roche against possible Herceptin biosimilars. The company developed pertuzumab and T-DM1 in order to protect (and increase) their market share in mBC market and it seems they got the advantage as there are no Herception biosimilars on the market yet.

 

Source: Roche press release

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